Quilts are becoming increasingly popular among hikers, backpackers and mountaineers because they are lighter, less bulky and more adaptable than mummy sleeping bags. Unlike a sleeping bag, a quilt leaves your back in direct contact with the sleeping pad (the bottom of the quilt is open) and doesn’t have any zipper. However, it is typically big enough to be partially tucked under your body. The main argument for using a quilt instead of a sleeping bag is that the insulation on the underside of a sleeping bag gets smashed by your body weight and is thus just an excessive weight to carry (note that smashed insulation provides very little warmth). Typically quilts also feature a foot box for better insulation in the feet area and come with straps so that they can be attached to a sleeping pad. Please note that a quilt is always used together with a sleeping pad – unless you want to have your back on the bare ground.
I took my Zpacks 30-degree quilt down to 17 degrees (with additional clothing of course) last year on a Skurka High Sierra adventure trip. I really have no idea what you are talking about regarding “widespread reputation” for cold under-insulated quilts. That is simply false because their quilts are in fact known to be accurately rated or even slightly underrated temperature wise.
The Nemo Siren Down Ultralight quilt is with a weight of 540 grams even lighter than the Sea to Summit Ember EB III quilt, but on the other hand also less insulated – it has a lower limit rating of -1°C. The quilt has a super lightweight shell which is made of 10-denier ripstop nylon and treated with DWR in order to repel water rather than absorbing it. The insulation layer uses a high-grade 850-fill power down and thus provides great loft and warmth. The quilt has a lacing system on the underside so that you can easily attach it to a sleeping pad. Another great feature is the insulated collar which comes around your shoulders and prevents cold drafts. The quilt comes with a stuff sack and measures only 25 x 25 centimeters when packed.
A quilt this artful comes around once in a blue moon. Featuring circular designs and botanical-inspired prints in a soothing color palette. The center panel is rendered in slubbed cotton for a vintage look, and finished with hand-stitched detailing. * Cotton, including the fill * Pieced quilt; solid back * Two-layer flannel fill for lightweight warmth * Sham features a small floral print and an env...
Here are our choices for the top 10 best backpacking quilts based on price, insulation, temperature rating, weight, features, versatility, sizing, and availability (see below for detailed explanations of each criteria.) All of these quilts are made and sold by so-called cottage manufacturers, which range in size from one-man shops to medium-sized businesses that employee dozens of people. All of them produce very high quality products that are significantly lighter weight and better performing than the quilts produced by mass-market gear companies like ENO, Therm-a-Rest, Kammock, Sea-to-Summit, and Sierra Designs.
I’ve had a Katabatic Gear Palisdade quilt since 2014, rated to 30 degrees, and can’t say enough about how warm it is! Very comfortable down to freezing, and liveable down into the 20s. The company is great as well – last year one of the mitten clips broke and one of the other attachment clips was starting to feel loose, and they repaired it for free and I only had to pay shipping to get it to them. Great customer service. Well worth the investment.
Our dream bedding has become a little dreamier — now offered in a modern printed stripe. All the same features our customers love about the solid-color Dream Quilt: all cotton, hand-stitched detailing, soft texture... * Quilted by hand for a delightful rippled texture * 100% cotton, right down to the billowy midweight fill * An ideal weight for all-season comfort * Sham has a simple envelope ...

There is no difference in warmth from duck down and goose down. However, geese are longer lived and larger birds, generally speaking. Duck down requires a bit more sorting to get a somewhat lower fill power down. Geese tend to produce more and larger down plumes than ducks do. So while you can get 800FP untreated duck down (treatment adds about 50FP) it is not suitable for higher fill powers from a manufacturing stand point (850-950FP.) Sort’a like buying clear knotless wood to do a job as opposed to common wood…you will buy 5 to 10 times as much to cut out only the clear parts of the wood for use. High fill (700-800FP) duck down will actually cost more to sort than the equivalent goose down. But, goose is in HIGH demand, which tends to drive the price higher. I use whatever the manufacturers prefer (!800-900FP) for my bags and quilts.


SIZING: When sizing a quilt, it’s important to understand whether the length includes the foot-box or not, since several inches of fabric are lost when forming a foot box. Quilt makers often provide recommended heights for users when quoting sizes, so look for these. Hammock users can usually get by with narrower quilts than ground sleepers, because they use underquilts which wrap around their sides and insulate them. Ground sleepers need the extra fabric and insulation to tuck under their sides to prevent drafts.
My current quilt is an Enlightened Equipment Revelation that I’m going into my second year on. It’s significantly lighter than the previous quilt (mostly due to a higher quality down – 950 vs 650 – and a lighter fabric) It’s actually a bit unnerving at first at just how light this is. My previous quilt didn’t have a good foot enclosure which really does make a difference in cooler temps. Bought it wide to get less drafts. Love the compressability.
Quality. Selection. Value. Three reasons to check us out before buying any quilt. Hundreds of handmade quilts, quillows, wall hangings and gift items from Amish, Mennonite and other local artisans. Spacious, well-lit showroom. Meticulous, professional sales staff. Located next to Miller's, Lancaster's original smorgasbord. Open 7 days. Visit website.
I could take a roll of paper towels down to 17 degrees with additional clothing but it might negate the weight savings of my super ultralight sleep system. I’ve heard a lot of people had that same issue on the PCT that Cheese had with both the Zpacks and EE quilts. It would be nice if both of those companies rated their quilts accurately though so people wouldn’t waste their money on a 40 degree quilt when they think they’re getting a 20 degree quilt. Furthermore, you can always tell a Z-Packs Fan Boy by how defensive they get about their company.
The Warbonnet Mamba is primarily designed for hammock use, but is available in a wider XL width (55″) which is more suitable for sleeping on the ground. It has a mummy-style footbox, is available in multiple lengths, and three temperature ratings, including 40, 20, and 0 degrees.  The Mamba is made with a black, 20d DWR ripstop shell fabric and overstuffed with 850 Fill Power Hyper-Dry Goose down. A regular sized 40-degree Mamba weighs 13.81 oz, while a wide weighs 16.3 oz. Price Range: $245.00-$330.00

Once again, Phillip…out of the ballpark with this review! In preps for my AT thru hike — start about a month from now — i bought an EE Convert (I was still not sure if I could go full quilt, just yet). The troops at EE were outstanding (I dealt with both Jacob and Tyler). Additionally, I went custom…and while concerned with time delay in doing so, EE provided me my pseudo-quilt in about two weeks! Amazing service, amazing product. And again, thanks for this website, amigo!
Like artisan-made quilts, the top of this one is also made in a piecework style and done in a mix of antique-inspired floral print. It’s made of 100% cotton, a hypo-allergenic and comfortable material for multiple seasons, and the quilt is oversize to work with taller mattresses and comes with two pillow shams. It comes prewashed and pre-shrunk and is reversible, too. Plus, more than 1,000 Amazon reviewers love this quilt.
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