Quilting is often thought of as communal activity such as a quilting bee where woman gather around a quilt frame to quilt a bed quilt. With Amish quilts today two, three or four people may work together to make a single quilt, but instead of quilting together each takes on a one or more of steps in the quilt making process. The first step in the process is to select the quilt's design and select and purchase the fabrics to be used in the quilt. Second step is to assemble the quilt top. Third step is to do the quilting and the fourth step is add the binding and ready the quilt for sale. It is not unusual for a different person to do each step. But the most common practice is for one person to do steps one, two and four and another person to the quilting. Occasionally a single person will do it all. The reason for the division of labor is that the work involved in each of the steps is quite different. The ability and artistic talent to select fabrics is not common --better for someone with this talent to apply it to the making of many quilts. Piecing a particular quilt top becomes easier and the workmanship better after quilter has made a half dozen tops of that design. So it is best to turn to a woman who is expert with a particular design to make the quilt top with that design. Quilting usually is not specialized to a particular design or style of quilt and is less cerebral -- in fact it may be a great distraction from the problems of the day. Applying the binding and readying the quilt for sale -- which means finding and removing spots, finding then adding missing lines of quilting, requires attention to detail. The coordination of the whole process is usually done by the person selecting the design and fabrics. This person selects Amish and Mennonite friends to work with on each quilt. Each person working on the quilt works on it in their own home. All work is done in America.

Once your child is old enough to have bedding in his crib, look for a lightweight quilt that can work in the crib and toddler bed by itself or as a layering piece. Choose a super-soft version made of 100% cotton and a lower-loft fill to keep your child warm without getting too hot. A lightweight version can also fit into your home washing machine to clean it when your child has an accident or an illness. Choose one in bright white that can be bleached if need be (because you know with kids, some kind of stain is inevitable!). The bonus with all-white: It will continue to match your child’s room decor and other bedding as their tastes change from one character or hobby to another. If you don’t like all-white, this one also comes in gray, blue and pink, or just with blue or pink borders.


Not so obvious is the special way these quilts are produced. At a time when practically every textile product sold in America is made in a sweatshop in Asia, these Amish quilts are made one at a time in people's American homes. What's more, these quilts are made using just the technology that was in common use 150 years ago. Because of the extensive handwork most women only take part in producing a couple of quilts each year.

EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL Soft, luxe organic-cotton velvet offers tempting texture and casual refinement, while the undyed linen backing keeps this quilt light and relaxed. Generously filled for plushness. * Quilt and sham have 100% organic-cotton velvet front; backed in undyed linen * Lofty 100% recycled-poly fill * Sham has linen-covered button closure * Pillow cover is velvet on ...
Once your child is old enough to have bedding in his crib, look for a lightweight quilt that can work in the crib and toddler bed by itself or as a layering piece. Choose a super-soft version made of 100% cotton and a lower-loft fill to keep your child warm without getting too hot. A lightweight version can also fit into your home washing machine to clean it when your child has an accident or an illness. Choose one in bright white that can be bleached if need be (because you know with kids, some kind of stain is inevitable!). The bonus with all-white: It will continue to match your child’s room decor and other bedding as their tastes change from one character or hobby to another. If you don’t like all-white, this one also comes in gray, blue and pink, or just with blue or pink borders.
Once again, Phillip…out of the ballpark with this review! In preps for my AT thru hike — start about a month from now — i bought an EE Convert (I was still not sure if I could go full quilt, just yet). The troops at EE were outstanding (I dealt with both Jacob and Tyler). Additionally, I went custom…and while concerned with time delay in doing so, EE provided me my pseudo-quilt in about two weeks! Amazing service, amazing product. And again, thanks for this website, amigo!
I could take a roll of paper towels down to 17 degrees with additional clothing but it might negate the weight savings of my super ultralight sleep system. I’ve heard a lot of people had that same issue on the PCT that Cheese had with both the Zpacks and EE quilts. It would be nice if both of those companies rated their quilts accurately though so people wouldn’t waste their money on a 40 degree quilt when they think they’re getting a 20 degree quilt. Furthermore, you can always tell a Z-Packs Fan Boy by how defensive they get about their company.
If you live in a chilly climate or in an a home with poor insulation, you know what it means to get cold at night! For these homes, you want high loft (meaning lots of material between the outer layers) and a material that will hold in heat, like down, down alternative or wool, to help you get and stay warm for hours on end, so look for a fluffy box-stitched quilt to do the trick. This one is made from 100% polyester and a down alternative to make it both hypoallergenic and more affordable and can be used with or without a duvet cover.
FEATURES: Most ultralight backpacking quilts are pretty similar when it comes right down to it. But there’s something unique about each of manufacturer’s quilts listed above that improves their performance in a unique way. For example: the use of continuous or chevron-shaped baffles, draft collars, zoned insulation, closed foot-boxes and external snaps for quilt layering, all improve cold weather performance. A strapless pad attachment system is far more convenient and comfortable than ones that rely on straps, while a head-hole enables multi-use as a garment. Look for these differentiators because they can have a profound influence on your backpacking experience.
Not so obvious is the special way these quilts are produced. At a time when practically every textile product sold in America is made in a sweatshop in Asia, these Amish quilts are made one at a time in people's American homes. What's more, these quilts are made using just the technology that was in common use 150 years ago. Because of the extensive handwork most women only take part in producing a couple of quilts each year.

I have both the Nunatak ArcUL -7C(20F) and the EE Revelation -7C (20F) quilts. The EE quilt is definitely not as warm as the Nunatak- about 5C -6C difference I would say. I would now, after much use, not take the EE to more than 0C and I now would use the Nunatak for everything to the quoted -7C. If in doubt I would take the Nunatak. In coldish weather I sleep in thermals, socks and woollen beanie. The two quilts warmth is not the same. I believe EE has looked into this. I don’t blame EE for this as an EN rating I believe is impossible to attain for a quilt and I am used to the idea of LIMIT and COMFORT ratings as per the EN standard for sleeping bags. For me the “COMFORT” on the EE is about 0C and the Nunatak is well towards/close to -7C. I bought the Nunatak 6 months ago and the EE one year ago. Also the Nunatak exactly matches the promised width dimensions, the EE does not by several centimetres.
There is no difference in warmth from duck down and goose down. However, geese are longer lived and larger birds, generally speaking. Duck down requires a bit more sorting to get a somewhat lower fill power down. Geese tend to produce more and larger down plumes than ducks do. So while you can get 800FP untreated duck down (treatment adds about 50FP) it is not suitable for higher fill powers from a manufacturing stand point (850-950FP.) Sort’a like buying clear knotless wood to do a job as opposed to common wood…you will buy 5 to 10 times as much to cut out only the clear parts of the wood for use. High fill (700-800FP) duck down will actually cost more to sort than the equivalent goose down. But, goose is in HIGH demand, which tends to drive the price higher. I use whatever the manufacturers prefer (!800-900FP) for my bags and quilts.
The Enlightened Equipment Revelation is a quilt that can be used in a hammock or for sleeping on the ground. It’s available in a wide range of different  length, widths, colors, temperature ratings, and fabric weights. The Revelation comes with a pad attachment system and a zippered/ drawstring footbox and half taper. You can also choose from three different grades of treated, water-resistant down: 850 fill power duck down and 900 or 950 fill power goose down. A basic made-to-order Revelation 40 weighs 14.32 oz. Price Range: $225.00-$510.00
More and more backpackers are switching from sleeping bags to backpacking quilts because they’re lighter weight, more compressible, and more comfortable, especially for side sleepers. While top quilts have always been popular with the hammock crowd because they’re easier to use in the confined space of a hammock, they’re also a great sleeping system option for ground sleepers, when coupled with a sleeping pad. Backpacking quilts are ideal for summer and warm weather since they’re so easy to vent if you’re too hot. But in freezing temperatures, starting at 30 degrees and below, most backpackers still prefer a sleeping bag because the wraparound fabric is less drafty.
SIZING: When sizing a quilt, it’s important to understand whether the length includes the foot-box or not, since several inches of fabric are lost when forming a foot box. Quilt makers often provide recommended heights for users when quoting sizes, so look for these. Hammock users can usually get by with narrower quilts than ground sleepers, because they use underquilts which wrap around their sides and insulate them. Ground sleepers need the extra fabric and insulation to tuck under their sides to prevent drafts.

Our dream bedding has become a little dreamier — now offered in a modern printed stripe. All the same features our customers love about the solid-color Dream Quilt: all cotton, hand-stitched detailing, soft texture... * Quilted by hand for a delightful rippled texture * 100% cotton, right down to the billowy midweight fill * An ideal weight for all-season comfort * Sham has a simple envelope ...


Our dream bedding has become a little dreamier — now offered in a modern printed stripe. All the same features our customers love about the solid-color Dream Quilt: all cotton, hand-stitched detailing, soft texture... * Quilted by hand for a delightful rippled texture * 100% cotton, right down to the billowy midweight fill * An ideal weight for all-season comfort * Sham has a simple envelope ...

Phew — yup, when you have no evidence to support a claim like a manufacturer paying for favorable feedback, it is unfair and unwarranted to do so. I clearly said I would consider other quilt manufacturers in the future and I value this article for insight into brands and products I haven’t used. When I bought my quilt a resource like this wasn’t available and the quilt options have skyrocketed. Has my ZPacks quilt served me well, yes. If that simple commentary makes me a fanboy and a paid commentator, I think you need to take a step back — I simply want to speak up for a product that has worked for me. Just in case it wasn’t clear earlier – thank you for this article Philip!


Amish Country Quilts is a marketplace not a quilt shop. Quilts listed here have been listed by the individuals responsible for them. When you purchase a quilt you will be purchasing it from the person who listed it. That person will accept your payment and ship your quilt to you. Each of these individuals pay a small commission on each sale to Amish Country Quilts in return for being listed here. Amish Country Quilts is based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and is operated by Doug Stuart.
AVAILABILITY: Many of the quilt makers who specialize in highly customized quilts often have very long backorder times (2 months or more)  during periods of high demand. If you need a quilt and can’t wait, you’re probably better off buying a less customized, off-the-shelf model. This one factor, more than any other, can often determine which quilt you select.
The advantage of buying a custom-made quilt from a cottage manufacturer is that you can personalize it with added features, higher quality/lighter weight insulation, or custom fabric colors. An increasing number of quilt makers also offer budget quilts made with a limited set of options that are much less expensive and often available immediately. These are a great option if you’re trying a backpacking quilt for the first time and overwhelmed by the customization choices available.
We rebuilt the traditional log-cabin-style quilt with concentric, small-scale geometrics in bold, bright colors that pop against a textured white ground. * 100% cotton: white fabric is slubbed cotton; printed fabric is cotton; fill is cotton batting * Multicolor print matches easily with a range of bedding options * Machine-quilted for precision * Medium-weight fill * Pieced-front quilt and sham * ...
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