To facilitate hand quilting, colorfast quilting weight cotton fabrics (and occasionally light weight woolen fabrics) are used to cover the fronts and backs of Amish quilts. Fabrics are purchased off-the-shelf from fabric stores or distributors in small quantities usually no more than a bolt of a particular fabric at a time. Extra wide fabric is purchased to be used to cover the back of the quilt. It is traditional and not unusual to use somewhat rustic cotton muslin on quilt backs and, where appropriate, on the front of quilts. Both solid color fabrics and printed fabrics are used in Amish quilts.

Quilting is often thought of as communal activity such as a quilting bee where woman gather around a quilt frame to quilt a bed quilt. With Amish quilts today two, three or four people may work together to make a single quilt, but instead of quilting together each takes on a one or more of steps in the quilt making process. The first step in the process is to select the quilt's design and select and purchase the fabrics to be used in the quilt. Second step is to assemble the quilt top. Third step is to do the quilting and the fourth step is add the binding and ready the quilt for sale. It is not unusual for a different person to do each step. But the most common practice is for one person to do steps one, two and four and another person to the quilting. Occasionally a single person will do it all. The reason for the division of labor is that the work involved in each of the steps is quite different. The ability and artistic talent to select fabrics is not common --better for someone with this talent to apply it to the making of many quilts. Piecing a particular quilt top becomes easier and the workmanship better after quilter has made a half dozen tops of that design. So it is best to turn to a woman who is expert with a particular design to make the quilt top with that design. Quilting usually is not specialized to a particular design or style of quilt and is less cerebral -- in fact it may be a great distraction from the problems of the day. Applying the binding and readying the quilt for sale -- which means finding and removing spots, finding then adding missing lines of quilting, requires attention to detail. The coordination of the whole process is usually done by the person selecting the design and fabrics. This person selects Amish and Mennonite friends to work with on each quilt. Each person working on the quilt works on it in their own home. All work is done in America.
How do rate the chevron style baffles on the loco libre ? I have a Hammock Gear with virtical baffles, and while I am a side sleeper the down seems to fall to the edges. I imagine the horizontal baffles suffer similar problems but in the other direction. I wonder what real world practice is really with the different baffle systems especially the chevron style?
More recently, what was once a social gathering has turned into a business enterprise for many “plain” (Amish and Mennonite) women. Cottage industries of quilt-makers are springing up throughout Amish Country in Pennsylvania. Many Amish and Mennonite women have opened up small quilt shops in their homes to subsidize the family’s income. While traveling throughout Lancaster, PA, it’s common to see a handmade sign stating simply: “Quilts Sold Here,” which is often accompanied by “No Sunday Sales.”
Here are our choices for the top 10 best backpacking quilts based on price, insulation, temperature rating, weight, features, versatility, sizing, and availability (see below for detailed explanations of each criteria.) All of these quilts are made and sold by so-called cottage manufacturers, which range in size from one-man shops to medium-sized businesses that employee dozens of people. All of them produce very high quality products that are significantly lighter weight and better performing than the quilts produced by mass-market gear companies like ENO, Therm-a-Rest, Kammock, Sea-to-Summit, and Sierra Designs.
The Warbonnet Mamba is primarily designed for hammock use, but is available in a wider XL width (55″) which is more suitable for sleeping on the ground. It has a mummy-style footbox, is available in multiple lengths, and three temperature ratings, including 40, 20, and 0 degrees.  The Mamba is made with a black, 20d DWR ripstop shell fabric and overstuffed with 850 Fill Power Hyper-Dry Goose down. A regular sized 40-degree Mamba weighs 13.81 oz, while a wide weighs 16.3 oz. Price Range: $245.00-$330.00

EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL Linear stitched channels give this quilt modern texture. One color in the front, another in back, and finely edged with a filled border. Made with linen, organic cotton, and light-weight cotton fill. * 52% linen and 48% organic-cotton covering * All-season 1800-gram cotton fill * Matches easily with a range of bedding options * Hand-guided machine stitching for exc...
The Sierra Designs Backcountry 700 quilt is slightly heavier (900 grams) than the quilts from Sea to Summit and Nemo listed above but because it provides great functionality, it is nevertheless very popular among hikers and backpackers. The quilt features hand pockets which allow you to snugly enclose it around your body when the temperature drops. For good insulation it has an insulated hood and a tight-fitting footbox. It is also slightly wider than the other quilts on this list and thus better at preventing cold drafts. The quilt features a 20-denier nylon shell which provides great abrasion resistance. The insulation layer consists of 700-fill power hydrophobic down – each down plume is treated with DWR so that it stays dry longer when exposed to moisture. The quilt has a lower limit rating of -8 C° by the EN standard and comes with a stuff sack for easy storage.
AVAILABILITY: Many of the quilt makers who specialize in highly customized quilts often have very long backorder times (2 months or more)  during periods of high demand. If you need a quilt and can’t wait, you’re probably better off buying a less customized, off-the-shelf model. This one factor, more than any other, can often determine which quilt you select.
The Warbonnet Mamba is primarily designed for hammock use, but is available in a wider XL width (55″) which is more suitable for sleeping on the ground. It has a mummy-style footbox, is available in multiple lengths, and three temperature ratings, including 40, 20, and 0 degrees.  The Mamba is made with a black, 20d DWR ripstop shell fabric and overstuffed with 850 Fill Power Hyper-Dry Goose down. A regular sized 40-degree Mamba weighs 13.81 oz, while a wide weighs 16.3 oz. Price Range: $245.00-$330.00
I could take a roll of paper towels down to 17 degrees with additional clothing but it might negate the weight savings of my super ultralight sleep system. I’ve heard a lot of people had that same issue on the PCT that Cheese had with both the Zpacks and EE quilts. It would be nice if both of those companies rated their quilts accurately though so people wouldn’t waste their money on a 40 degree quilt when they think they’re getting a 20 degree quilt. Furthermore, you can always tell a Z-Packs Fan Boy by how defensive they get about their company.
The Sierra Designs Backcountry 700 quilt is slightly heavier (900 grams) than the quilts from Sea to Summit and Nemo listed above but because it provides great functionality, it is nevertheless very popular among hikers and backpackers. The quilt features hand pockets which allow you to snugly enclose it around your body when the temperature drops. For good insulation it has an insulated hood and a tight-fitting footbox. It is also slightly wider than the other quilts on this list and thus better at preventing cold drafts. The quilt features a 20-denier nylon shell which provides great abrasion resistance. The insulation layer consists of 700-fill power hydrophobic down – each down plume is treated with DWR so that it stays dry longer when exposed to moisture. The quilt has a lower limit rating of -8 C° by the EN standard and comes with a stuff sack for easy storage.
To facilitate hand quilting, colorfast quilting weight cotton fabrics (and occasionally light weight woolen fabrics) are used to cover the fronts and backs of Amish quilts. Fabrics are purchased off-the-shelf from fabric stores or distributors in small quantities usually no more than a bolt of a particular fabric at a time. Extra wide fabric is purchased to be used to cover the back of the quilt. It is traditional and not unusual to use somewhat rustic cotton muslin on quilt backs and, where appropriate, on the front of quilts. Both solid color fabrics and printed fabrics are used in Amish quilts.
There is no difference in warmth from duck down and goose down. However, geese are longer lived and larger birds, generally speaking. Duck down requires a bit more sorting to get a somewhat lower fill power down. Geese tend to produce more and larger down plumes than ducks do. So while you can get 800FP untreated duck down (treatment adds about 50FP) it is not suitable for higher fill powers from a manufacturing stand point (850-950FP.) Sort’a like buying clear knotless wood to do a job as opposed to common wood…you will buy 5 to 10 times as much to cut out only the clear parts of the wood for use. High fill (700-800FP) duck down will actually cost more to sort than the equivalent goose down. But, goose is in HIGH demand, which tends to drive the price higher. I use whatever the manufacturers prefer (!800-900FP) for my bags and quilts.
EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL Soft, luxe organic-cotton velvet offers tempting texture and casual refinement, while the undyed linen backing keeps this quilt light and relaxed. Generously filled for plushness. * Quilt and sham have 100% organic-cotton velvet front; backed in undyed linen * Lofty 100% recycled-poly fill * Sham has linen-covered button closure * Pillow cover is velvet on ...
I could take a roll of paper towels down to 17 degrees with additional clothing but it might negate the weight savings of my super ultralight sleep system. I’ve heard a lot of people had that same issue on the PCT that Cheese had with both the Zpacks and EE quilts. It would be nice if both of those companies rated their quilts accurately though so people wouldn’t waste their money on a 40 degree quilt when they think they’re getting a 20 degree quilt. Furthermore, you can always tell a Z-Packs Fan Boy by how defensive they get about their company.
Quilts are becoming increasingly popular among hikers, backpackers and mountaineers because they are lighter, less bulky and more adaptable than mummy sleeping bags. Unlike a sleeping bag, a quilt leaves your back in direct contact with the sleeping pad (the bottom of the quilt is open) and doesn’t have any zipper. However, it is typically big enough to be partially tucked under your body. The main argument for using a quilt instead of a sleeping bag is that the insulation on the underside of a sleeping bag gets smashed by your body weight and is thus just an excessive weight to carry (note that smashed insulation provides very little warmth). Typically quilts also feature a foot box for better insulation in the feet area and come with straps so that they can be attached to a sleeping pad. Please note that a quilt is always used together with a sleeping pad – unless you want to have your back on the bare ground.
A dazzling diamond print adds facets of beauty to a kid's room, dorm, or guest room. Composed of seven harmonious hues, and backed with a surprise gingham print, making it easy to mix and match with sheets. * 100% cotton: fabric is cotton cambric; fill is cotton batting * Hand-quilted around each diamond tile for added depth and dimension * Medium-weight fill * Quilt and sham are backed with pa...

The Sierra Designs Backcountry 700 quilt is slightly heavier (900 grams) than the quilts from Sea to Summit and Nemo listed above but because it provides great functionality, it is nevertheless very popular among hikers and backpackers. The quilt features hand pockets which allow you to snugly enclose it around your body when the temperature drops. For good insulation it has an insulated hood and a tight-fitting footbox. It is also slightly wider than the other quilts on this list and thus better at preventing cold drafts. The quilt features a 20-denier nylon shell which provides great abrasion resistance. The insulation layer consists of 700-fill power hydrophobic down – each down plume is treated with DWR so that it stays dry longer when exposed to moisture. The quilt has a lower limit rating of -8 C° by the EN standard and comes with a stuff sack for easy storage.
A trio of borders frames a dancing paisley print, delivering both sophistication and spirit. Crafted in soft cotton, its soothing color palette is a perfect partner for a master bedroom or guest room. * 100% cotton: fabric is soft cotton; fill is cotton batting * Hand-quilted for added depth and dimension * Medium-weight fill * Pieced-front quilt and sham, backed with sage paisley floral * Quilt is...
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