Not a fan of these Z-Packs Fan Boys, as some people like to call them. I have no way to prove it, but I think Z-Packs pays people for favorable reviews/comments. The favorable comments above probably came from one guy with a bunch of different “user accounts.” I’ve struggled with wanting to buy a Z-Packs tent and backpack in the past because their reviews and low weights are super enticing but I don’t think their equipment is built to last. This is coming from someone who’s never owned Z-Packs gear so take that as you will.
The Nemo Siren Down Ultralight quilt is with a weight of 540 grams even lighter than the Sea to Summit Ember EB III quilt, but on the other hand also less insulated – it has a lower limit rating of -1°C. The quilt has a super lightweight shell which is made of 10-denier ripstop nylon and treated with DWR in order to repel water rather than absorbing it. The insulation layer uses a high-grade 850-fill power down and thus provides great loft and warmth. The quilt has a lacing system on the underside so that you can easily attach it to a sleeping pad. Another great feature is the insulated collar which comes around your shoulders and prevents cold drafts. The quilt comes with a stuff sack and measures only 25 x 25 centimeters when packed.
The Mid-Atlantic Mountain Works Marcy 20 is three season quilt available in a multiple widths, lengths, tapers, shell fabrics, and colors. It has a unique side draft elimination system for ground sleepers that relies on perimeter shock cord rather than sleeping pad straps, which are easy to lose or forget at home. The Marcy 20 has a vented footbox and can be insulated with 850 fill power HyperDry goose down or 800 fill power, untreated duck down. A basic, regular Marcy 20 weighs 23 oz. Price Range: $235.00-$350.00.
Amish Country Quilts is a marketplace not a quilt shop. Quilts listed here have been listed by the individuals responsible for them. When you purchase a quilt you will be purchasing it from the person who listed it. That person will accept your payment and ship your quilt to you. Each of these individuals pay a small commission on each sale to Amish Country Quilts in return for being listed here. Amish Country Quilts is based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and is operated by Doug Stuart.

Quilting is often thought of as communal activity such as a quilting bee where woman gather around a quilt frame to quilt a bed quilt. With Amish quilts today two, three or four people may work together to make a single quilt, but instead of quilting together each takes on a one or more of steps in the quilt making process. The first step in the process is to select the quilt's design and select and purchase the fabrics to be used in the quilt. Second step is to assemble the quilt top. Third step is to do the quilting and the fourth step is add the binding and ready the quilt for sale. It is not unusual for a different person to do each step. But the most common practice is for one person to do steps one, two and four and another person to the quilting. Occasionally a single person will do it all. The reason for the division of labor is that the work involved in each of the steps is quite different. The ability and artistic talent to select fabrics is not common --better for someone with this talent to apply it to the making of many quilts. Piecing a particular quilt top becomes easier and the workmanship better after quilter has made a half dozen tops of that design. So it is best to turn to a woman who is expert with a particular design to make the quilt top with that design. Quilting usually is not specialized to a particular design or style of quilt and is less cerebral -- in fact it may be a great distraction from the problems of the day. Applying the binding and readying the quilt for sale -- which means finding and removing spots, finding then adding missing lines of quilting, requires attention to detail. The coordination of the whole process is usually done by the person selecting the design and fabrics. This person selects Amish and Mennonite friends to work with on each quilt. Each person working on the quilt works on it in their own home. All work is done in America.
VERSATILITY: Some backpacking quilts can be used in a wider variety of ways than others, which may be an important factor based on the way you like to backpack. For example, quilts that can be fully unzipped can be used as a blanket in a wider range of temperatures that those with closed foot boxes. Wider width quilts can be used for hammocks and ground sleeping, something to consider if you plan on doing both.
Quality. Selection. Value. Three reasons to check us out before buying any quilt. Hundreds of handmade quilts, quillows, wall hangings and gift items from Amish, Mennonite and other local artisans. Spacious, well-lit showroom. Meticulous, professional sales staff. Located next to Miller's, Lancaster's original smorgasbord. Open 7 days. Visit website.
FEATURES: Most ultralight backpacking quilts are pretty similar when it comes right down to it. But there’s something unique about each of manufacturer’s quilts listed above that improves their performance in a unique way. For example: the use of continuous or chevron-shaped baffles, draft collars, zoned insulation, closed foot-boxes and external snaps for quilt layering, all improve cold weather performance. A strapless pad attachment system is far more convenient and comfortable than ones that rely on straps, while a head-hole enables multi-use as a garment. Look for these differentiators because they can have a profound influence on your backpacking experience.
I don’t own a zero rated sleeping bag anymore. Instead, I have a 20 degree bag and a 20 degree quilt. Typically I use the quilt for most camping and then when it gets too cool (typically in the under 40 range) due to me moving and causing drafts, I’ll switch to the bag. Then, when it’s even colder (I’ve been down to near zero) I simply use the quilt over the sleeping bag and I’ve been plenty warm – even more so than my old 0 degree. The bulk isn’t much more than what a real 0 degree bag would be. Things like my phone can be placed in the zippered pocket on the outside of my sleeping bag and kept warm enough by the quilt.
We rebuilt the traditional log-cabin-style quilt with concentric, small-scale geometrics in bold, bright colors that pop against a textured white ground. * 100% cotton: white fabric is slubbed cotton; printed fabric is cotton; fill is cotton batting * Multicolor print matches easily with a range of bedding options * Machine-quilted for precision * Medium-weight fill * Pieced-front quilt and sham * ...
I’ve had a Katabatic Gear Palisdade quilt since 2014, rated to 30 degrees, and can’t say enough about how warm it is! Very comfortable down to freezing, and liveable down into the 20s. The company is great as well – last year one of the mitten clips broke and one of the other attachment clips was starting to feel loose, and they repaired it for free and I only had to pay shipping to get it to them. Great customer service. Well worth the investment.
A quilt this artful comes around once in a blue moon. Featuring circular designs and botanical-inspired prints in a soothing color palette. The center panel is rendered in slubbed cotton for a vintage look, and finished with hand-stitched detailing. * Cotton, including the fill * Pieced quilt; solid back * Two-layer flannel fill for lightweight warmth * Sham features a small floral print and an env...
The Mid-Atlantic Mountain Works Marcy 20 is three season quilt available in a multiple widths, lengths, tapers, shell fabrics, and colors. It has a unique side draft elimination system for ground sleepers that relies on perimeter shock cord rather than sleeping pad straps, which are easy to lose or forget at home. The Marcy 20 has a vented footbox and can be insulated with 850 fill power HyperDry goose down or 800 fill power, untreated duck down. A basic, regular Marcy 20 weighs 23 oz. Price Range: $235.00-$350.00.
If you live in a place with a real change in seasons, look for a midweight quilt that will be comfortable when it’s warm out, but that’s easy to layer in the colder months. Choose a quilt in a solid, neutral color to give yourself the most flexibility as you transition through the seasons: In summer, pair it with lightweight cotton or linen sheets, then in winter trade in flannel sheets and top it with an extra throw blanket or duvet if you need more warmth.
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