Turning up the color dial, our bold, hand-stitched quilt features a boho block print in a range of jewel tones. An ideal centerpiece for a master suite or luxurious guestroom, featuring an artfully placed block-print floral in the center and a dramatic Moroccan-tile-inpsired-print double border that cascades over the sides of the bed. * Lightweight quilt with ornamental block prints and tile-inspir...
VERSATILITY: Some backpacking quilts can be used in a wider variety of ways than others, which may be an important factor based on the way you like to backpack. For example, quilts that can be fully unzipped can be used as a blanket in a wider range of temperatures that those with closed foot boxes. Wider width quilts can be used for hammocks and ground sleeping, something to consider if you plan on doing both.

EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL The shimmer of silk, the comfort of cotton. Subtle quilting adds slight texture, with increased tacking, placed just so, for refined drama. * Front is 70% organic cotton and 30% silk * Backed with 100% organic cotton voile * 200-gram recycled poly fill * Quilt and sham have quilting on front only * Quilt has denser tacking at bottom hem; Standard Sham has denser ta...

The advantage of buying a custom-made quilt from a cottage manufacturer is that you can personalize it with added features, higher quality/lighter weight insulation, or custom fabric colors. An increasing number of quilt makers also offer budget quilts made with a limited set of options that are much less expensive and often available immediately. These are a great option if you’re trying a backpacking quilt for the first time and overwhelmed by the customization choices available.
EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL Linear stitched channels give this quilt modern texture. One color in the front, another in back, and finely edged with a filled border. Made with linen, organic cotton, and light-weight cotton fill. * 52% linen and 48% organic-cotton covering * All-season 1800-gram cotton fill * Matches easily with a range of bedding options * Hand-guided machine stitching for exc...
To facilitate hand quilting, colorfast quilting weight cotton fabrics (and occasionally light weight woolen fabrics) are used to cover the fronts and backs of Amish quilts. Fabrics are purchased off-the-shelf from fabric stores or distributors in small quantities usually no more than a bolt of a particular fabric at a time. Extra wide fabric is purchased to be used to cover the back of the quilt. It is traditional and not unusual to use somewhat rustic cotton muslin on quilt backs and, where appropriate, on the front of quilts. Both solid color fabrics and printed fabrics are used in Amish quilts.
Our dream bedding has become a little dreamier — now offered in a modern printed stripe. All the same features our customers love about the solid-color Dream Quilt: all cotton, hand-stitched detailing, soft texture... * Quilted by hand for a delightful rippled texture * 100% cotton, right down to the billowy midweight fill * An ideal weight for all-season comfort * Sham has a simple envelope ...
TEMPERATURE RATINGS: The introduction of standardized sleeping bag temperature ratings by the outdoor industry substantially improved their reliability. Many manufacturers had overstated their temperature ratings by as much as 10 degrees before that standard was introduced. No such testing standard exists for backpacking quilts, so you’re forced to rely on their reputation and customer reviews. When buying a backpacking quilt, the current rule of thumb is to purchase one rated for 10 degrees below your needs to ensure you’ll be warm enough. There is enormous incentive for ultralight quilt makers to quote low gear weights, so read their customer reviews carefully.  Women may want to add 15-20 degrees of insulation because they sleep colder than men due to lower body mass. No one makes women’s specific quilts yet, although there is an obvious need for them.
WEIGHT: While gear weight is important, be careful not to sacrifice your comfort by selecting a quilt that won’t keep you warm in the conditions you need it to. In fact, insulation is usually the lightest weight component of a quilt, where the bulk of its weight comes primarily from the fabric used to make it. When choosing fabrics, consider their breathability and whether they have a DWR coating, which can be important if the foot of your quilt gets wet regularly  If you plan on using your quilt heavily, consider getting a heavier inner shell fabric as this is where the greatest wear and tear occurs over the long-term.
Quilts utilize either down or synthetic insulation. Down insulation is more thermally efficient (with a superior warmth-to-weight ratio) and compresses better than synthetic insulation. However, down insulation also has downsides; it is more expensive and unable to provide good warmth when exposed to moisture (sweat, rain, high humidity etc.). Nevertheless, as quilts are primarily intended for lightweight hiking, we only included quilts with down insulation in this review.
More recently, what was once a social gathering has turned into a business enterprise for many “plain” (Amish and Mennonite) women. Cottage industries of quilt-makers are springing up throughout Amish Country in Pennsylvania. Many Amish and Mennonite women have opened up small quilt shops in their homes to subsidize the family’s income. While traveling throughout Lancaster, PA, it’s common to see a handmade sign stating simply: “Quilts Sold Here,” which is often accompanied by “No Sunday Sales.”
If you live in a chilly climate or in an a home with poor insulation, you know what it means to get cold at night! For these homes, you want high loft (meaning lots of material between the outer layers) and a material that will hold in heat, like down, down alternative or wool, to help you get and stay warm for hours on end, so look for a fluffy box-stitched quilt to do the trick. This one is made from 100% polyester and a down alternative to make it both hypoallergenic and more affordable and can be used with or without a duvet cover.
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