I don’t own a zero rated sleeping bag anymore. Instead, I have a 20 degree bag and a 20 degree quilt. Typically I use the quilt for most camping and then when it gets too cool (typically in the under 40 range) due to me moving and causing drafts, I’ll switch to the bag. Then, when it’s even colder (I’ve been down to near zero) I simply use the quilt over the sleeping bag and I’ve been plenty warm – even more so than my old 0 degree. The bulk isn’t much more than what a real 0 degree bag would be. Things like my phone can be placed in the zippered pocket on the outside of my sleeping bag and kept warm enough by the quilt.
The Therm-a-Rest Corus HD quilt is another great choice for 3-season hiking. The quilt uses 650-fill power down which is treated with Nikwax so that it repels the water (hydrophobic down) rather than absorbing it. Therefore, it offers better warmth when exposed to moisture than regular down. The shell is made of 20-denier DWR treated nylon for good abrasion resistance and weather protection. The quilt has also an elastic footbox so that it keeps your feet warm at low temperatures. As it features snap loops it can easily be attached to a sleeping pad. It comes in two different sizes – regular (193 cm in length) and long (203 cm in length).

Once again, Phillip…out of the ballpark with this review! In preps for my AT thru hike — start about a month from now — i bought an EE Convert (I was still not sure if I could go full quilt, just yet). The troops at EE were outstanding (I dealt with both Jacob and Tyler). Additionally, I went custom…and while concerned with time delay in doing so, EE provided me my pseudo-quilt in about two weeks! Amazing service, amazing product. And again, thanks for this website, amigo!
It’s easy to buy a very lightweight quilt, but can you buy one that is true to its temperature rating? Don’t get me wrong. I love UL quilts and use them, but some vendor’s quilts are warmer than others. If a brand overemphasizes gear weight, look carefully at the amount of down fill/quality they include in their bags. This is a case of the fox guarding the hen house. There is enormous incentive to emphasize gear weight and therefore a good reason to consider buying a warmer bag or adding down overfill to guarantee a warmer experience.
I have both the Nunatak ArcUL -7C(20F) and the EE Revelation -7C (20F) quilts. The EE quilt is definitely not as warm as the Nunatak- about 5C -6C difference I would say. I would now, after much use, not take the EE to more than 0C and I now would use the Nunatak for everything to the quoted -7C. If in doubt I would take the Nunatak. In coldish weather I sleep in thermals, socks and woollen beanie. The two quilts warmth is not the same. I believe EE has looked into this. I don’t blame EE for this as an EN rating I believe is impossible to attain for a quilt and I am used to the idea of LIMIT and COMFORT ratings as per the EN standard for sleeping bags. For me the “COMFORT” on the EE is about 0C and the Nunatak is well towards/close to -7C. I bought the Nunatak 6 months ago and the EE one year ago. Also the Nunatak exactly matches the promised width dimensions, the EE does not by several centimetres.
Not so obvious is the special way these quilts are produced. At a time when practically every textile product sold in America is made in a sweatshop in Asia, these Amish quilts are made one at a time in people's American homes. What's more, these quilts are made using just the technology that was in common use 150 years ago. Because of the extensive handwork most women only take part in producing a couple of quilts each year.
While I understand the Zpacks commentary and feel it is deserved to a degree, I just want to also chime in that I own one of their quilts and find it to be warm and well built. Will I consider these other manufacturers in the future? Sure — this article proves there are a lot of great options out there and perhaps Zpacks will be revisited in the future.
AVAILABILITY: Many of the quilt makers who specialize in highly customized quilts often have very long backorder times (2 months or more)  during periods of high demand. If you need a quilt and can’t wait, you’re probably better off buying a less customized, off-the-shelf model. This one factor, more than any other, can often determine which quilt you select.
While I understand the Zpacks commentary and feel it is deserved to a degree, I just want to also chime in that I own one of their quilts and find it to be warm and well built. Will I consider these other manufacturers in the future? Sure — this article proves there are a lot of great options out there and perhaps Zpacks will be revisited in the future.
Celebrate bedtime with a sprinkling of cheerful confetti! Our hand-stitched quilt and sham are adorned with a classic diamond pattern and multicolored pom-poms for a fresh, festive look. * Cotton voile * Adorned with acrylic pom-poms * 100-gram recycled-poly fill * Quilt and sham have hand-quilting on the front, with hand-attached pom-poms; solid back, finished with petite binding * Sham has flap c...
I took my Zpacks 30-degree quilt down to 17 degrees (with additional clothing of course) last year on a Skurka High Sierra adventure trip. I really have no idea what you are talking about regarding “widespread reputation” for cold under-insulated quilts. That is simply false because their quilts are in fact known to be accurately rated or even slightly underrated temperature wise.
Quilts are becoming increasingly popular among hikers, backpackers and mountaineers because they are lighter, less bulky and more adaptable than mummy sleeping bags. Unlike a sleeping bag, a quilt leaves your back in direct contact with the sleeping pad (the bottom of the quilt is open) and doesn’t have any zipper. However, it is typically big enough to be partially tucked under your body. The main argument for using a quilt instead of a sleeping bag is that the insulation on the underside of a sleeping bag gets smashed by your body weight and is thus just an excessive weight to carry (note that smashed insulation provides very little warmth). Typically quilts also feature a foot box for better insulation in the feet area and come with straps so that they can be attached to a sleeping pad. Please note that a quilt is always used together with a sleeping pad – unless you want to have your back on the bare ground.

The Paria Thermodown 15 quilt is incredibly warm as it features no less than 22 ounces of 700-fill power down. However, with a weight of more than two pounds, it is also the heaviest products in this review. The Paria quilt has a lower limit rating at 15 F and thus it is perfect for backpacking in relatively cold weather. It has a very light and breathable shell and comfortable inner layer. The Paria quilt comes with a stuff sack for easy storage and has two straps to easily secure it to your sleeping pad. It can also be closed up to form a standard mummy sleeping bag in case that temperatures drop too low. The Paria Thermodown 15 quilt is a great option for beginners as well as more experienced backpackers.

INSULATION: High quality goose and duck down with fill powers of 800, 850, 900, and 950 provide excellent insulation by weight and are widely preferred by backpackers because they’re so lightweight. In addition to excellent compressibility, quilts insulated with down will last for decades of use if properly cared for. Some manufacturers only offer down that’s been treated with a water-repellent coating, while others prefer to offer it unadulterated. Down is naturally water-resistant so the jury is still out on whether “treated” down lasts as long and insulates as well in the real world vs. a testing lab. Regardless, with a little care and common sense you can keep a down quilt dry by carrying it in a waterproof stuff stack, picking good campsites that don’t flood in rain, and airing it out occasionally in the sun.
The Jacks ‘R’ Better Sierra Sniveller is a 25-30 degree (24 oz) quilt can be used for sleeping in a hammock or on the ground and includes perimeter tabs for a ground attachment system. It’s unique because it can also be worn as an insulated garment, with a non-snagging, mixed hook & loop re-sealable head hole in the chest. The hole seals tightly when not used so there’s no heat loss through it. You can also choose between a drawstring or sewn in foot box. The Sniveller is available in two lengths and filled with 800 fill power goose down, either treated or untreated. Price Range: $270.00-$280.00
Offering a modern take on a traditional pieced design, this popular quilt features lively circular patches of retro prints, and hand-stitched detailing for enhanced depth and dimension. * Made from 100% cotton, including its cotton-flannel fill * Lightweight for all-season comfort and beautiful drape * Hand-quilted for added texture * Quilt and sham are backed in mini-floral print * From bold m...
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