The UGQ Bandit has a unique baffle design that separates the torso insulation from the foot box insulation so you can put extra insulation where it’s needed most. The Bandit is also highly customizable and available in a wide range of widths, lengths, and temperatures. You can choose untreated 800 fill power duck, 850 goose, or 950 goose down, several different fabric options (in a multitude of colors) with different breathability and DWR characteristics, a draft collar, full or no taper, and three different foot box options. A sleeping pad attachment system is also included for free. A basic Bandit 40 weighs 14 oz. Price Range: $160-$400.
Quilts require less fabric and insulation than sleeping bags and are thus in average 30% lighter and smaller (when packed) even while using the same materials. As they don’t fit snugly around your body, they also allow you to wear clothes during the night for extra warmth. However, quilts also have disadvantages in comparison to sleeping bags. They have to be used with a sleeping pad and they don’t prevent air drafts as good as sleeping bags, since the warm air escapes to the outside when you wiggle around. Therefore, they are not recommended for very cold weather, but most quilts do offer sufficient warmth for 3-season hiking.
The quality of down insulation is measured by the fill-power index which ranges from 400 (low grade down) to 900 (high grade down). The higher the fill-power index, the better warmth for the weight the insulation provides. Down is often treated with DWR (Durable Water Repellant) so that it becomes better at retaining warmth when exposed to moisture. Such down is referred to as hydrophobic down.
Amish quilts are entirely hand quilted. The quilt top, batting, and quilt backing fabric are sandwiched together and held taut in a quilting frame. The quilter then uses needle and thread to place each quilting stitch in the quilt. A typical queen size bed quilt will have forty to fifty thousand such stitches. The quilting stitches are small (6 to 12 per inch), straight and uniform. To insure uniformity all the quilting for each quilt is done by one quilter.
I don’t own a zero rated sleeping bag anymore. Instead, I have a 20 degree bag and a 20 degree quilt. Typically I use the quilt for most camping and then when it gets too cool (typically in the under 40 range) due to me moving and causing drafts, I’ll switch to the bag. Then, when it’s even colder (I’ve been down to near zero) I simply use the quilt over the sleeping bag and I’ve been plenty warm – even more so than my old 0 degree. The bulk isn’t much more than what a real 0 degree bag would be. Things like my phone can be placed in the zippered pocket on the outside of my sleeping bag and kept warm enough by the quilt.
An elegant approach to the printed whole-cloth quilt, this oversized paisley design with a tile-inspired border has the look and feel of a grand piazza. * A sophisticated ornamental print with just a hint of pop * Hand-quilted with a diamond pattern for added depth and dimension * The quilt features an artfully placed oversized paisley design in the center, with a tile-inspired border * 100% cotton...

Unless you live in the tropics, most of us need a little warmth at night! A well-made quilt is the perfect bed topper that can both keep you cozy and set the decor tone for your room, and it’s also an easy and inexpensive way to introduce an all-new color or pattern into your bedroom. Whether you live in a warmer climate where you just need light coverage or a colder one that requires some real layers, quilts come in a variety of styles, materials and weights to suit your needs. The beauty of a quilt is that it can work alone or with layers of other bedding, so it can easily transition through changes of season or simply from napping during the warm daytime and going to bed in the chilly night.
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