Quilts require less fabric and insulation than sleeping bags and are thus in average 30% lighter and smaller (when packed) even while using the same materials. As they don’t fit snugly around your body, they also allow you to wear clothes during the night for extra warmth. However, quilts also have disadvantages in comparison to sleeping bags. They have to be used with a sleeping pad and they don’t prevent air drafts as good as sleeping bags, since the warm air escapes to the outside when you wiggle around. Therefore, they are not recommended for very cold weather, but most quilts do offer sufficient warmth for 3-season hiking.
If you live in a place with a real change in seasons, look for a midweight quilt that will be comfortable when it’s warm out, but that’s easy to layer in the colder months. Choose a quilt in a solid, neutral color to give yourself the most flexibility as you transition through the seasons: In summer, pair it with lightweight cotton or linen sheets, then in winter trade in flannel sheets and top it with an extra throw blanket or duvet if you need more warmth.
Quality. Selection. Value. Three reasons to check us out before buying any quilt. Hundreds of handmade quilts, quillows, wall hangings and gift items from Amish, Mennonite and other local artisans. Spacious, well-lit showroom. Meticulous, professional sales staff. Located next to Miller's, Lancaster's original smorgasbord. Open 7 days. Visit website.
Here are our choices for the top 10 best backpacking quilts based on price, insulation, temperature rating, weight, features, versatility, sizing, and availability (see below for detailed explanations of each criteria.) All of these quilts are made and sold by so-called cottage manufacturers, which range in size from one-man shops to medium-sized businesses that employee dozens of people. All of them produce very high quality products that are significantly lighter weight and better performing than the quilts produced by mass-market gear companies like ENO, Therm-a-Rest, Kammock, Sea-to-Summit, and Sierra Designs.
There is no difference in warmth from duck down and goose down. However, geese are longer lived and larger birds, generally speaking. Duck down requires a bit more sorting to get a somewhat lower fill power down. Geese tend to produce more and larger down plumes than ducks do. So while you can get 800FP untreated duck down (treatment adds about 50FP) it is not suitable for higher fill powers from a manufacturing stand point (850-950FP.) Sort’a like buying clear knotless wood to do a job as opposed to common wood…you will buy 5 to 10 times as much to cut out only the clear parts of the wood for use. High fill (700-800FP) duck down will actually cost more to sort than the equivalent goose down. But, goose is in HIGH demand, which tends to drive the price higher. I use whatever the manufacturers prefer (!800-900FP) for my bags and quilts.
ALSO OFFERED IN LOFTY WHITE DOWN Weight: Lightweight warmth Fill: Hypoallergenic Core-Loft® Shell: Long-staple cotton Our essential comforter — now offered in an energetic kaleidoscope-inspired diamond print with a coordinating sham. This layer is a go-to piece for every bed in the house. * Designed for down-sensitive sleepers, it is filled with hypoallergenic Core-Loft® (550 fill p...
A quilt this artful comes around once in a blue moon. Featuring circular designs and botanical-inspired prints in a soothing color palette. The center panel is rendered in slubbed cotton for a vintage look, and finished with hand-stitched detailing. * Cotton, including the fill * Pieced quilt; solid back * Two-layer flannel fill for lightweight warmth * Sham features a small floral print and an env...
Quilts utilize either down or synthetic insulation. Down insulation is more thermally efficient (with a superior warmth-to-weight ratio) and compresses better than synthetic insulation. However, down insulation also has downsides; it is more expensive and unable to provide good warmth when exposed to moisture (sweat, rain, high humidity etc.). Nevertheless, as quilts are primarily intended for lightweight hiking, we only included quilts with down insulation in this review.

For the record, I am using an EMS 20 degree bag that’s about 10 years old now. I’m going to be very sad when it needs replacing as it has a bunch of features that probably make it a bit heavier, but also make it very adaptive. Things like a removable hood, multiple draft cinches, a slightly wider body so I can turn easily on my side, and the previously mentioned pocket for keeping stuff like a phone, flashlight, etc handy.


For the record, I am using an EMS 20 degree bag that’s about 10 years old now. I’m going to be very sad when it needs replacing as it has a bunch of features that probably make it a bit heavier, but also make it very adaptive. Things like a removable hood, multiple draft cinches, a slightly wider body so I can turn easily on my side, and the previously mentioned pocket for keeping stuff like a phone, flashlight, etc handy.
Our dream bedding has become a little dreamier — now offered in a modern printed stripe. All the same features our customers love about the solid-color Dream Quilt: all cotton, hand-stitched detailing, soft texture... * Quilted by hand for a delightful rippled texture * 100% cotton, right down to the billowy midweight fill * An ideal weight for all-season comfort * Sham has a simple envelope ...

Quilts are becoming increasingly popular among hikers, backpackers and mountaineers because they are lighter, less bulky and more adaptable than mummy sleeping bags. Unlike a sleeping bag, a quilt leaves your back in direct contact with the sleeping pad (the bottom of the quilt is open) and doesn’t have any zipper. However, it is typically big enough to be partially tucked under your body. The main argument for using a quilt instead of a sleeping bag is that the insulation on the underside of a sleeping bag gets smashed by your body weight and is thus just an excessive weight to carry (note that smashed insulation provides very little warmth). Typically quilts also feature a foot box for better insulation in the feet area and come with straps so that they can be attached to a sleeping pad. Please note that a quilt is always used together with a sleeping pad – unless you want to have your back on the bare ground.
Quilts utilize either down or synthetic insulation. Down insulation is more thermally efficient (with a superior warmth-to-weight ratio) and compresses better than synthetic insulation. However, down insulation also has downsides; it is more expensive and unable to provide good warmth when exposed to moisture (sweat, rain, high humidity etc.). Nevertheless, as quilts are primarily intended for lightweight hiking, we only included quilts with down insulation in this review.
TEMPERATURE RATINGS: The introduction of standardized sleeping bag temperature ratings by the outdoor industry substantially improved their reliability. Many manufacturers had overstated their temperature ratings by as much as 10 degrees before that standard was introduced. No such testing standard exists for backpacking quilts, so you’re forced to rely on their reputation and customer reviews. When buying a backpacking quilt, the current rule of thumb is to purchase one rated for 10 degrees below your needs to ensure you’ll be warm enough. There is enormous incentive for ultralight quilt makers to quote low gear weights, so read their customer reviews carefully.  Women may want to add 15-20 degrees of insulation because they sleep colder than men due to lower body mass. No one makes women’s specific quilts yet, although there is an obvious need for them.
More recently, what was once a social gathering has turned into a business enterprise for many “plain” (Amish and Mennonite) women. Cottage industries of quilt-makers are springing up throughout Amish Country in Pennsylvania. Many Amish and Mennonite women have opened up small quilt shops in their homes to subsidize the family’s income. While traveling throughout Lancaster, PA, it’s common to see a handmade sign stating simply: “Quilts Sold Here,” which is often accompanied by “No Sunday Sales.”
The Loco Libre Gear Ghost Pepper is a down quilt made with a unique chevron style baffle, which limits the amount of down shift by catching it in the corners that the baffle forms every time it changes direction. This eliminates cold spots and means that the down stays on top, where you want it, so you can stay warm. The Ghost Pepper is available in a wide range or widths and lengths, color choices, insulation types, and foot box styles. You can even add a sleeping pad attachment system. This can all be very confusing for first time quilt buyers, but they are very patient and happy to explain “the why” before you buy. Some of the of the key options offered are 800 duck or 900 goose fill power water-resistant down, a draft collar, different taper styles, a drawstring vented or closed footbox, and added insulation. A basic Ghost Pepper 40 weighs in at 14.5 oz. Price Range: $154.00-$474.00
Quilts utilize either down or synthetic insulation. Down insulation is more thermally efficient (with a superior warmth-to-weight ratio) and compresses better than synthetic insulation. However, down insulation also has downsides; it is more expensive and unable to provide good warmth when exposed to moisture (sweat, rain, high humidity etc.). Nevertheless, as quilts are primarily intended for lightweight hiking, we only included quilts with down insulation in this review.
AVAILABILITY: Many of the quilt makers who specialize in highly customized quilts often have very long backorder times (2 months or more)  during periods of high demand. If you need a quilt and can’t wait, you’re probably better off buying a less customized, off-the-shelf model. This one factor, more than any other, can often determine which quilt you select.

The UGQ Bandit has a unique baffle design that separates the torso insulation from the foot box insulation so you can put extra insulation where it’s needed most. The Bandit is also highly customizable and available in a wide range of widths, lengths, and temperatures. You can choose untreated 800 fill power duck, 850 goose, or 950 goose down, several different fabric options (in a multitude of colors) with different breathability and DWR characteristics, a draft collar, full or no taper, and three different foot box options. A sleeping pad attachment system is also included for free. A basic Bandit 40 weighs 14 oz. Price Range: $160-$400.


Once your child is old enough to have bedding in his crib, look for a lightweight quilt that can work in the crib and toddler bed by itself or as a layering piece. Choose a super-soft version made of 100% cotton and a lower-loft fill to keep your child warm without getting too hot. A lightweight version can also fit into your home washing machine to clean it when your child has an accident or an illness. Choose one in bright white that can be bleached if need be (because you know with kids, some kind of stain is inevitable!). The bonus with all-white: It will continue to match your child’s room decor and other bedding as their tastes change from one character or hobby to another. If you don’t like all-white, this one also comes in gray, blue and pink, or just with blue or pink borders.
×