The UGQ Bandit has a unique baffle design that separates the torso insulation from the foot box insulation so you can put extra insulation where it’s needed most. The Bandit is also highly customizable and available in a wide range of widths, lengths, and temperatures. You can choose untreated 800 fill power duck, 850 goose, or 950 goose down, several different fabric options (in a multitude of colors) with different breathability and DWR characteristics, a draft collar, full or no taper, and three different foot box options. A sleeping pad attachment system is also included for free. A basic Bandit 40 weighs 14 oz. Price Range: $160-$400.
Not so obvious is the special way these quilts are produced. At a time when practically every textile product sold in America is made in a sweatshop in Asia, these Amish quilts are made one at a time in people's American homes. What's more, these quilts are made using just the technology that was in common use 150 years ago. Because of the extensive handwork most women only take part in producing a couple of quilts each year.
The Warbonnet Mamba is primarily designed for hammock use, but is available in a wider XL width (55″) which is more suitable for sleeping on the ground. It has a mummy-style footbox, is available in multiple lengths, and three temperature ratings, including 40, 20, and 0 degrees.  The Mamba is made with a black, 20d DWR ripstop shell fabric and overstuffed with 850 Fill Power Hyper-Dry Goose down. A regular sized 40-degree Mamba weighs 13.81 oz, while a wide weighs 16.3 oz. Price Range: $245.00-$330.00
I have both the Nunatak ArcUL -7C(20F) and the EE Revelation -7C (20F) quilts. The EE quilt is definitely not as warm as the Nunatak- about 5C -6C difference I would say. I would now, after much use, not take the EE to more than 0C and I now would use the Nunatak for everything to the quoted -7C. If in doubt I would take the Nunatak. In coldish weather I sleep in thermals, socks and woollen beanie. The two quilts warmth is not the same. I believe EE has looked into this. I don’t blame EE for this as an EN rating I believe is impossible to attain for a quilt and I am used to the idea of LIMIT and COMFORT ratings as per the EN standard for sleeping bags. For me the “COMFORT” on the EE is about 0C and the Nunatak is well towards/close to -7C. I bought the Nunatak 6 months ago and the EE one year ago. Also the Nunatak exactly matches the promised width dimensions, the EE does not by several centimetres.
I could take a roll of paper towels down to 17 degrees with additional clothing but it might negate the weight savings of my super ultralight sleep system. I’ve heard a lot of people had that same issue on the PCT that Cheese had with both the Zpacks and EE quilts. It would be nice if both of those companies rated their quilts accurately though so people wouldn’t waste their money on a 40 degree quilt when they think they’re getting a 20 degree quilt. Furthermore, you can always tell a Z-Packs Fan Boy by how defensive they get about their company.
It’s easy to buy a very lightweight quilt, but can you buy one that is true to its temperature rating? Don’t get me wrong. I love UL quilts and use them, but some vendor’s quilts are warmer than others. If a brand overemphasizes gear weight, look carefully at the amount of down fill/quality they include in their bags. This is a case of the fox guarding the hen house. There is enormous incentive to emphasize gear weight and therefore a good reason to consider buying a warmer bag or adding down overfill to guarantee a warmer experience.
Give them the world, every night. Our quilt and sham easily enchant kids and grown-ups alike with their globe print illustrated by Molly Hatch Designs. Each continent is represented by a menagerie of creatures, from pandas to penguins, hippos to hedgehogs. * Shell is 100% cotton * 100-gram recycled-poly fill * Quilt and sham have solid back; finished with a refined binding * Sham has flap closu...
Whether you live someplace warm or like to throw the windows open come summertime, a lightweight quilt is a must to be comfortable in the nighttime chill or with the air conditioning going. But you’ll want to stay away from heavier materials like wool fill or densely woven outer layers so you don’t get too hot. This quilt is made of 100% cotton in both the fill and outer layers, so it provides a little bit of warmth but still breathes, and won’t hold on to humidity. It’s made by artisans in India (a country that gets very, very hot) using a traditional weaving method called “kantha” and takes six days to make. It’s super-soft and can be used alone on the bed for hotter days, or layered under or over a duvet when it’s really chilly.
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