Unless you live in the tropics, most of us need a little warmth at night! A well-made quilt is the perfect bed topper that can both keep you cozy and set the decor tone for your room, and it’s also an easy and inexpensive way to introduce an all-new color or pattern into your bedroom. Whether you live in a warmer climate where you just need light coverage or a colder one that requires some real layers, quilts come in a variety of styles, materials and weights to suit your needs. The beauty of a quilt is that it can work alone or with layers of other bedding, so it can easily transition through changes of season or simply from napping during the warm daytime and going to bed in the chilly night.
Give them the world, every night. Our quilt and sham easily enchant kids and grown-ups alike with their globe print illustrated by Molly Hatch Designs. Each continent is represented by a menagerie of creatures, from pandas to penguins, hippos to hedgehogs. * Shell is 100% cotton * 100-gram recycled-poly fill * Quilt and sham have solid back; finished with a refined binding * Sham has flap closu...
Phew — yup, when you have no evidence to support a claim like a manufacturer paying for favorable feedback, it is unfair and unwarranted to do so. I clearly said I would consider other quilt manufacturers in the future and I value this article for insight into brands and products I haven’t used. When I bought my quilt a resource like this wasn’t available and the quilt options have skyrocketed. Has my ZPacks quilt served me well, yes. If that simple commentary makes me a fanboy and a paid commentator, I think you need to take a step back — I simply want to speak up for a product that has worked for me. Just in case it wasn’t clear earlier – thank you for this article Philip!
I don’t own a zero rated sleeping bag anymore. Instead, I have a 20 degree bag and a 20 degree quilt. Typically I use the quilt for most camping and then when it gets too cool (typically in the under 40 range) due to me moving and causing drafts, I’ll switch to the bag. Then, when it’s even colder (I’ve been down to near zero) I simply use the quilt over the sleeping bag and I’ve been plenty warm – even more so than my old 0 degree. The bulk isn’t much more than what a real 0 degree bag would be. Things like my phone can be placed in the zippered pocket on the outside of my sleeping bag and kept warm enough by the quilt.
If you live in a chilly climate or in an a home with poor insulation, you know what it means to get cold at night! For these homes, you want high loft (meaning lots of material between the outer layers) and a material that will hold in heat, like down, down alternative or wool, to help you get and stay warm for hours on end, so look for a fluffy box-stitched quilt to do the trick. This one is made from 100% polyester and a down alternative to make it both hypoallergenic and more affordable and can be used with or without a duvet cover.

TEMPERATURE RATINGS: The introduction of standardized sleeping bag temperature ratings by the outdoor industry substantially improved their reliability. Many manufacturers had overstated their temperature ratings by as much as 10 degrees before that standard was introduced. No such testing standard exists for backpacking quilts, so you’re forced to rely on their reputation and customer reviews. When buying a backpacking quilt, the current rule of thumb is to purchase one rated for 10 degrees below your needs to ensure you’ll be warm enough. There is enormous incentive for ultralight quilt makers to quote low gear weights, so read their customer reviews carefully.  Women may want to add 15-20 degrees of insulation because they sleep colder than men due to lower body mass. No one makes women’s specific quilts yet, although there is an obvious need for them.
The Warbonnet Mamba is primarily designed for hammock use, but is available in a wider XL width (55″) which is more suitable for sleeping on the ground. It has a mummy-style footbox, is available in multiple lengths, and three temperature ratings, including 40, 20, and 0 degrees.  The Mamba is made with a black, 20d DWR ripstop shell fabric and overstuffed with 850 Fill Power Hyper-Dry Goose down. A regular sized 40-degree Mamba weighs 13.81 oz, while a wide weighs 16.3 oz. Price Range: $245.00-$330.00
To facilitate hand quilting, colorfast quilting weight cotton fabrics (and occasionally light weight woolen fabrics) are used to cover the fronts and backs of Amish quilts. Fabrics are purchased off-the-shelf from fabric stores or distributors in small quantities usually no more than a bolt of a particular fabric at a time. Extra wide fabric is purchased to be used to cover the back of the quilt. It is traditional and not unusual to use somewhat rustic cotton muslin on quilt backs and, where appropriate, on the front of quilts. Both solid color fabrics and printed fabrics are used in Amish quilts.
If you live in a chilly climate or in an a home with poor insulation, you know what it means to get cold at night! For these homes, you want high loft (meaning lots of material between the outer layers) and a material that will hold in heat, like down, down alternative or wool, to help you get and stay warm for hours on end, so look for a fluffy box-stitched quilt to do the trick. This one is made from 100% polyester and a down alternative to make it both hypoallergenic and more affordable and can be used with or without a duvet cover.
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