I took my Zpacks 30-degree quilt down to 17 degrees (with additional clothing of course) last year on a Skurka High Sierra adventure trip. I really have no idea what you are talking about regarding “widespread reputation” for cold under-insulated quilts. That is simply false because their quilts are in fact known to be accurately rated or even slightly underrated temperature wise.
Quilts are becoming increasingly popular among hikers, backpackers and mountaineers because they are lighter, less bulky and more adaptable than mummy sleeping bags. Unlike a sleeping bag, a quilt leaves your back in direct contact with the sleeping pad (the bottom of the quilt is open) and doesn’t have any zipper. However, it is typically big enough to be partially tucked under your body. The main argument for using a quilt instead of a sleeping bag is that the insulation on the underside of a sleeping bag gets smashed by your body weight and is thus just an excessive weight to carry (note that smashed insulation provides very little warmth). Typically quilts also feature a foot box for better insulation in the feet area and come with straps so that they can be attached to a sleeping pad. Please note that a quilt is always used together with a sleeping pad – unless you want to have your back on the bare ground.

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FEATURES: Most ultralight backpacking quilts are pretty similar when it comes right down to it. But there’s something unique about each of manufacturer’s quilts listed above that improves their performance in a unique way. For example: the use of continuous or chevron-shaped baffles, draft collars, zoned insulation, closed foot-boxes and external snaps for quilt layering, all improve cold weather performance. A strapless pad attachment system is far more convenient and comfortable than ones that rely on straps, while a head-hole enables multi-use as a garment. Look for these differentiators because they can have a profound influence on your backpacking experience.
Offering a modern take on a traditional pieced design, this popular quilt features lively circular patches of retro prints, and hand-stitched detailing for enhanced depth and dimension. * Made from 100% cotton, including its cotton-flannel fill * Lightweight for all-season comfort and beautiful drape * Hand-quilted for added texture * Quilt and sham are backed in mini-floral print * From bold m...
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I have both the Nunatak ArcUL -7C(20F) and the EE Revelation -7C (20F) quilts. The EE quilt is definitely not as warm as the Nunatak- about 5C -6C difference I would say. I would now, after much use, not take the EE to more than 0C and I now would use the Nunatak for everything to the quoted -7C. If in doubt I would take the Nunatak. In coldish weather I sleep in thermals, socks and woollen beanie. The two quilts warmth is not the same. I believe EE has looked into this. I don’t blame EE for this as an EN rating I believe is impossible to attain for a quilt and I am used to the idea of LIMIT and COMFORT ratings as per the EN standard for sleeping bags. For me the “COMFORT” on the EE is about 0C and the Nunatak is well towards/close to -7C. I bought the Nunatak 6 months ago and the EE one year ago. Also the Nunatak exactly matches the promised width dimensions, the EE does not by several centimetres.
Celebrate bedtime with a sprinkling of cheerful confetti! Our hand-stitched quilt and sham are adorned with a classic diamond pattern and multicolored pom-poms for a fresh, festive look. * Cotton voile * Adorned with acrylic pom-poms * 100-gram recycled-poly fill * Quilt and sham have hand-quilting on the front, with hand-attached pom-poms; solid back, finished with petite binding * Sham has flap c...
I have both the Nunatak ArcUL -7C(20F) and the EE Revelation -7C (20F) quilts. The EE quilt is definitely not as warm as the Nunatak- about 5C -6C difference I would say. I would now, after much use, not take the EE to more than 0C and I now would use the Nunatak for everything to the quoted -7C. If in doubt I would take the Nunatak. In coldish weather I sleep in thermals, socks and woollen beanie. The two quilts warmth is not the same. I believe EE has looked into this. I don’t blame EE for this as an EN rating I believe is impossible to attain for a quilt and I am used to the idea of LIMIT and COMFORT ratings as per the EN standard for sleeping bags. For me the “COMFORT” on the EE is about 0C and the Nunatak is well towards/close to -7C. I bought the Nunatak 6 months ago and the EE one year ago. Also the Nunatak exactly matches the promised width dimensions, the EE does not by several centimetres.
More and more backpackers are switching from sleeping bags to backpacking quilts because they’re lighter weight, more compressible, and more comfortable, especially for side sleepers. While top quilts have always been popular with the hammock crowd because they’re easier to use in the confined space of a hammock, they’re also a great sleeping system option for ground sleepers, when coupled with a sleeping pad. Backpacking quilts are ideal for summer and warm weather since they’re so easy to vent if you’re too hot. But in freezing temperatures, starting at 30 degrees and below, most backpackers still prefer a sleeping bag because the wraparound fabric is less drafty.
Whether you live someplace warm or like to throw the windows open come summertime, a lightweight quilt is a must to be comfortable in the nighttime chill or with the air conditioning going. But you’ll want to stay away from heavier materials like wool fill or densely woven outer layers so you don’t get too hot. This quilt is made of 100% cotton in both the fill and outer layers, so it provides a little bit of warmth but still breathes, and won’t hold on to humidity. It’s made by artisans in India (a country that gets very, very hot) using a traditional weaving method called “kantha” and takes six days to make. It’s super-soft and can be used alone on the bed for hotter days, or layered under or over a duvet when it’s really chilly.
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