EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL The shimmer of silk, the comfort of cotton. Subtle quilting adds slight texture, with increased tacking, placed just so, for refined drama. * Front is 70% organic cotton and 30% silk * Backed with 100% organic cotton voile * 200-gram recycled poly fill * Quilt and sham have quilting on front only * Quilt has denser tacking at bottom hem; Standard Sham has denser ta...

I took my Zpacks 30-degree quilt down to 17 degrees (with additional clothing of course) last year on a Skurka High Sierra adventure trip. I really have no idea what you are talking about regarding “widespread reputation” for cold under-insulated quilts. That is simply false because their quilts are in fact known to be accurately rated or even slightly underrated temperature wise.
We gave the traditional Broken Dishes quilt a modern, energetic update with a dazzling mix-up of solid-velvet and printed-cotton-sateen triangles. * Pieced front is a mix of solid 100% cotton velvet and printed 100% cotton sateen; with hand-tacking for added drama * 100% cotton-sateen backing with allover floral print * Recycled-poly fill * Sham has cotton sateen floral-print binding an...

There is no difference in warmth from duck down and goose down. However, geese are longer lived and larger birds, generally speaking. Duck down requires a bit more sorting to get a somewhat lower fill power down. Geese tend to produce more and larger down plumes than ducks do. So while you can get 800FP untreated duck down (treatment adds about 50FP) it is not suitable for higher fill powers from a manufacturing stand point (850-950FP.) Sort’a like buying clear knotless wood to do a job as opposed to common wood…you will buy 5 to 10 times as much to cut out only the clear parts of the wood for use. High fill (700-800FP) duck down will actually cost more to sort than the equivalent goose down. But, goose is in HIGH demand, which tends to drive the price higher. I use whatever the manufacturers prefer (!800-900FP) for my bags and quilts.

I took my Zpacks 30-degree quilt down to 17 degrees (with additional clothing of course) last year on a Skurka High Sierra adventure trip. I really have no idea what you are talking about regarding “widespread reputation” for cold under-insulated quilts. That is simply false because their quilts are in fact known to be accurately rated or even slightly underrated temperature wise.
INSULATION: High quality goose and duck down with fill powers of 800, 850, 900, and 950 provide excellent insulation by weight and are widely preferred by backpackers because they’re so lightweight. In addition to excellent compressibility, quilts insulated with down will last for decades of use if properly cared for. Some manufacturers only offer down that’s been treated with a water-repellent coating, while others prefer to offer it unadulterated. Down is naturally water-resistant so the jury is still out on whether “treated” down lasts as long and insulates as well in the real world vs. a testing lab. Regardless, with a little care and common sense you can keep a down quilt dry by carrying it in a waterproof stuff stack, picking good campsites that don’t flood in rain, and airing it out occasionally in the sun.
Like artisan-made quilts, the top of this one is also made in a piecework style and done in a mix of antique-inspired floral print. It’s made of 100% cotton, a hypo-allergenic and comfortable material for multiple seasons, and the quilt is oversize to work with taller mattresses and comes with two pillow shams. It comes prewashed and pre-shrunk and is reversible, too. Plus, more than 1,000 Amazon reviewers love this quilt.
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