More and more backpackers are switching from sleeping bags to backpacking quilts because they’re lighter weight, more compressible, and more comfortable, especially for side sleepers. While top quilts have always been popular with the hammock crowd because they’re easier to use in the confined space of a hammock, they’re also a great sleeping system option for ground sleepers, when coupled with a sleeping pad. Backpacking quilts are ideal for summer and warm weather since they’re so easy to vent if you’re too hot. But in freezing temperatures, starting at 30 degrees and below, most backpackers still prefer a sleeping bag because the wraparound fabric is less drafty.
To facilitate hand quilting, colorfast quilting weight cotton fabrics (and occasionally light weight woolen fabrics) are used to cover the fronts and backs of Amish quilts. Fabrics are purchased off-the-shelf from fabric stores or distributors in small quantities usually no more than a bolt of a particular fabric at a time. Extra wide fabric is purchased to be used to cover the back of the quilt. It is traditional and not unusual to use somewhat rustic cotton muslin on quilt backs and, where appropriate, on the front of quilts. Both solid color fabrics and printed fabrics are used in Amish quilts.
Since polyester batting became available sixty years ago it has been the batting material most always used in Amish quilts. Being much easier to quilt than raw cotton batting found in antique quilts and by making a quilt much easier to launder (wet cotton batting weighs 'a ton!') practical Amish women quickly made the switch. Excellent but more expensive woolen batting is also occasionally used in Amish quilts.

I’ve had a Katabatic Gear Palisdade quilt since 2014, rated to 30 degrees, and can’t say enough about how warm it is! Very comfortable down to freezing, and liveable down into the 20s. The company is great as well – last year one of the mitten clips broke and one of the other attachment clips was starting to feel loose, and they repaired it for free and I only had to pay shipping to get it to them. Great customer service. Well worth the investment.
Whether you live someplace warm or like to throw the windows open come summertime, a lightweight quilt is a must to be comfortable in the nighttime chill or with the air conditioning going. But you’ll want to stay away from heavier materials like wool fill or densely woven outer layers so you don’t get too hot. This quilt is made of 100% cotton in both the fill and outer layers, so it provides a little bit of warmth but still breathes, and won’t hold on to humidity. It’s made by artisans in India (a country that gets very, very hot) using a traditional weaving method called “kantha” and takes six days to make. It’s super-soft and can be used alone on the bed for hotter days, or layered under or over a duvet when it’s really chilly.
EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL Linear stitched channels give this quilt modern texture. One color in the front, another in back, and finely edged with a filled border. Made with linen, organic cotton, and light-weight cotton fill. * 52% linen and 48% organic-cotton covering * All-season 1800-gram cotton fill * Matches easily with a range of bedding options * Hand-guided machine stitching for exc...
A warm, cozy quilt doesn’t have to be expensive. In general, quilts made with man-made materials, like microfiber and polyester, will be less expensive without sacrificing on warmth, softness or style. If you’re trying to make your money stretch further, choose one in a solid color you love with classic, unfussy stitching that can carry you through rounds of redecorating or work in different rooms over the years. This silky-soft quilt set (it includes shams as well) is oversized, meaning you have a few extra inches all around — a great option to cover the whole bed when you have a taller or pillow-top mattress on top of a box spring. It comes in more than fifteen colors to find the perfect shade for your home.
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