TEMPERATURE RATINGS: The introduction of standardized sleeping bag temperature ratings by the outdoor industry substantially improved their reliability. Many manufacturers had overstated their temperature ratings by as much as 10 degrees before that standard was introduced. No such testing standard exists for backpacking quilts, so you’re forced to rely on their reputation and customer reviews. When buying a backpacking quilt, the current rule of thumb is to purchase one rated for 10 degrees below your needs to ensure you’ll be warm enough. There is enormous incentive for ultralight quilt makers to quote low gear weights, so read their customer reviews carefully.  Women may want to add 15-20 degrees of insulation because they sleep colder than men due to lower body mass. No one makes women’s specific quilts yet, although there is an obvious need for them.
A dazzling diamond print adds facets of beauty to a kid's room, dorm, or guest room. Composed of seven harmonious hues, and backed with a surprise gingham print, making it easy to mix and match with sheets. * 100% cotton: fabric is cotton cambric; fill is cotton batting * Hand-quilted around each diamond tile for added depth and dimension * Medium-weight fill * Quilt and sham are backed with pa...
I took my Zpacks 30-degree quilt down to 17 degrees (with additional clothing of course) last year on a Skurka High Sierra adventure trip. I really have no idea what you are talking about regarding “widespread reputation” for cold under-insulated quilts. That is simply false because their quilts are in fact known to be accurately rated or even slightly underrated temperature wise.
Quilts utilize either down or synthetic insulation. Down insulation is more thermally efficient (with a superior warmth-to-weight ratio) and compresses better than synthetic insulation. However, down insulation also has downsides; it is more expensive and unable to provide good warmth when exposed to moisture (sweat, rain, high humidity etc.). Nevertheless, as quilts are primarily intended for lightweight hiking, we only included quilts with down insulation in this review.
A light, carefree look that's reminiscent of a seaside cottage. This airy cotton quilt features squares of painterly watercolor stripes, pieced this way and that for an artful patchwork effect. * Cotton shell; lofty recycled-poly fill * Hand-tacked for just the right amount of loft * Quilt and sham are backed in an allover mini-floral print * Finished with floral binding that matches the backing * ...
The MassDrop Revelation Quilt is a ready-made budget backpacking quilt of their own design, manufactured in China on a contract basis by Enlightened Equipment. If you’re not familiar with MassDrop, they sell small batches of a specific product called “drops” over a multi-day period, giving increasingly deeper discounts when higher volumes are sold. While the specs of the quilts they sell can vary from batch to batch, they’re usually one-step down from the custom or on-the-shelf quilts sold directly by Enlightened Equipment, with slightly heavier shell fabrics and lower fill power down insulation. Despite the differences, they’re high quality backpacking quilts and priced to move!
Quilts, unlike blankets, are made of at least two layers of fabric with a warmth-inducing filler in between, with decorative stitching to hold the whole quilt sandwich together. Depending on what materials are used, a quilt can either be quite lightweight and breathable (great for warm-weather spots) or extremely warm and cozy. Typically, you can find that information in the product description (usually it’s described as light-, medium- or heavy-weight), but generally cotton is lighter-weight while materials like wool or microfiber will offer more warmth. Here, the best quilts for your needs. 
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