If you live in a chilly climate or in an a home with poor insulation, you know what it means to get cold at night! For these homes, you want high loft (meaning lots of material between the outer layers) and a material that will hold in heat, like down, down alternative or wool, to help you get and stay warm for hours on end, so look for a fluffy box-stitched quilt to do the trick. This one is made from 100% polyester and a down alternative to make it both hypoallergenic and more affordable and can be used with or without a duvet cover.

The quality of down insulation is measured by the fill-power index which ranges from 400 (low grade down) to 900 (high grade down). The higher the fill-power index, the better warmth for the weight the insulation provides. Down is often treated with DWR (Durable Water Repellant) so that it becomes better at retaining warmth when exposed to moisture. Such down is referred to as hydrophobic down.
WEIGHT: While gear weight is important, be careful not to sacrifice your comfort by selecting a quilt that won’t keep you warm in the conditions you need it to. In fact, insulation is usually the lightest weight component of a quilt, where the bulk of its weight comes primarily from the fabric used to make it. When choosing fabrics, consider their breathability and whether they have a DWR coating, which can be important if the foot of your quilt gets wet regularly  If you plan on using your quilt heavily, consider getting a heavier inner shell fabric as this is where the greatest wear and tear occurs over the long-term.
Since polyester batting became available sixty years ago it has been the batting material most always used in Amish quilts. Being much easier to quilt than raw cotton batting found in antique quilts and by making a quilt much easier to launder (wet cotton batting weighs 'a ton!') practical Amish women quickly made the switch. Excellent but more expensive woolen batting is also occasionally used in Amish quilts.
FEATURES: Most ultralight backpacking quilts are pretty similar when it comes right down to it. But there’s something unique about each of manufacturer’s quilts listed above that improves their performance in a unique way. For example: the use of continuous or chevron-shaped baffles, draft collars, zoned insulation, closed foot-boxes and external snaps for quilt layering, all improve cold weather performance. A strapless pad attachment system is far more convenient and comfortable than ones that rely on straps, while a head-hole enables multi-use as a garment. Look for these differentiators because they can have a profound influence on your backpacking experience.
Amish Country Quilts is a marketplace not a quilt shop. Quilts listed here have been listed by the individuals responsible for them. When you purchase a quilt you will be purchasing it from the person who listed it. That person will accept your payment and ship your quilt to you. Each of these individuals pay a small commission on each sale to Amish Country Quilts in return for being listed here. Amish Country Quilts is based in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and is operated by Doug Stuart.
As with any rule of thumb, rules were meant to be broken. Ducks actually produce the *best* down. The Eider duck produces a fine 700FP-750FP down that many consider the best you can buy. It actually holds heat better than goose down, regardless of the fill power. Fill power only measures loft, NOT the actual insulating value of the down. Eider down is “clingy”, not slippery like goose down, meaning it will form a more even layer in a bag preventing cold spots/under filled areas. It is also more water proof than goose down, naturally. And each barbule on a plume is more springy making it compress/recover better. Why don’t I use it?? COST. The 16-18oz fill alone for a sleeping bag runs between $1000-6000. Beware of mixes and “Eider” brand names, they usually are not 100% premium eiderdown.

The Sea to Summit Ember EB III quilt is very light (it weighs merely 757 grams) and thus perfect for those who prefer lightweight hiking. Despite its low weight, it offers great insulation – it has the lower limit rating of -10°C by the EN standard. The shell and lining are made of 15-denier nylon which provides great durability for the weight. The quilt uses 750-fill power Ultra Dry Down which is treated with DWR (Durable Water Repellant) so that it resists moisture. Sea to Summit claims that Ultra Dry Down absorbs 30% less moisture than untreated down and is up to 60% better at retaining loft when wet. The Sea to Summit Ember EB III quilt also features a footbox with a drawcord and an adjustable strap system for easy attachment to the sleeping pad. Press studs down the side of the quilt allow you to close the lower half for better insulation. The Sea to Summit Ember EB III quilt is due to its low weight and superb insulation a great option for hikers, mountaineers and other outdoor enthusiasts who need reliable sleeping equipment for 3-season hiking.
Since polyester batting became available sixty years ago it has been the batting material most always used in Amish quilts. Being much easier to quilt than raw cotton batting found in antique quilts and by making a quilt much easier to launder (wet cotton batting weighs 'a ton!') practical Amish women quickly made the switch. Excellent but more expensive woolen batting is also occasionally used in Amish quilts.
The comforter gets a lot of the credit for making your bed into the plush slumber sanctuary that it is. The quilt, meanwhile, is one of the most underrated bedding elements, easily adding extra warmth in the winter and a lighter cover option in the summer, as well as a tailored, textural layer that enhances the overall look of your sleep space year-round. Here are nine quilts that we wouldn't dream of kicking out of bed.
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