In this review we selected the best backpacking quilts for 3-season adventures. We were especially looking for highly functional products which have a great warmth-to-weight ratio. If you think you might want to go for a sleeping bag instead, check out our review of the Best Lightweight 3-season Sleeping Bags. As quilts leave your back in direct contact with a sleeping pad, many use them together with sleeping bag liners which significantly increase the comfort for very little added weight (a sleeping bag liner can weigh as little as 100 grams). Check out our review of the Best Sleeping Bag Liners here.
Quilts require less fabric and insulation than sleeping bags and are thus in average 30% lighter and smaller (when packed) even while using the same materials. As they don’t fit snugly around your body, they also allow you to wear clothes during the night for extra warmth. However, quilts also have disadvantages in comparison to sleeping bags. They have to be used with a sleeping pad and they don’t prevent air drafts as good as sleeping bags, since the warm air escapes to the outside when you wiggle around. Therefore, they are not recommended for very cold weather, but most quilts do offer sufficient warmth for 3-season hiking.
If you live in a chilly climate or in an a home with poor insulation, you know what it means to get cold at night! For these homes, you want high loft (meaning lots of material between the outer layers) and a material that will hold in heat, like down, down alternative or wool, to help you get and stay warm for hours on end, so look for a fluffy box-stitched quilt to do the trick. This one is made from 100% polyester and a down alternative to make it both hypoallergenic and more affordable and can be used with or without a duvet cover.
A quilt this artful comes around once in a blue moon. Featuring circular designs and botanical-inspired prints in a soothing color palette. The center panel is rendered in slubbed cotton for a vintage look, and finished with hand-stitched detailing. * Cotton, including the fill * Pieced quilt; solid back * Two-layer flannel fill for lightweight warmth * Sham features a small floral print and an env...

Patchwork piecing of Amish quilts is usually done with a sewing machine. Connecting patchwork pieces together this way makes the quilt very strong. What's more, this stitching can not be seen once the quilt is completed. Amish women have used non-electric sewing machines since they first became available over 150 years ago. On the other hand, applique work is all done by hand, as is most embroidery and binding.
INSULATION: High quality goose and duck down with fill powers of 800, 850, 900, and 950 provide excellent insulation by weight and are widely preferred by backpackers because they’re so lightweight. In addition to excellent compressibility, quilts insulated with down will last for decades of use if properly cared for. Some manufacturers only offer down that’s been treated with a water-repellent coating, while others prefer to offer it unadulterated. Down is naturally water-resistant so the jury is still out on whether “treated” down lasts as long and insulates as well in the real world vs. a testing lab. Regardless, with a little care and common sense you can keep a down quilt dry by carrying it in a waterproof stuff stack, picking good campsites that don’t flood in rain, and airing it out occasionally in the sun.
ALSO OFFERED IN DOWN-FREE CORE-LOFT® Weight: Lightweight warmth Fill: White down Shell: Long-staple cotton Our essential comforter — now offered in an energetic kaleidoscope-inspired diamond print with a coordinating sham, making it a comfy choice to dress the top of the bed. This layer is a go-to piece for every bed in the house. * Filled with plush white down (550 fill power) * Covered...
We rebuilt the traditional log-cabin-style quilt with concentric, small-scale geometrics in bold, bright colors that pop against a textured white ground. * 100% cotton: white fabric is slubbed cotton; printed fabric is cotton; fill is cotton batting * Multicolor print matches easily with a range of bedding options * Machine-quilted for precision * Medium-weight fill * Pieced-front quilt and sham * ...
An elegant approach to the printed whole-cloth quilt, this oversized paisley design with a tile-inspired border has the look and feel of a grand piazza. * A sophisticated ornamental print with just a hint of pop * Hand-quilted with a diamond pattern for added depth and dimension * The quilt features an artfully placed oversized paisley design in the center, with a tile-inspired border * 100% cotton...

EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL Linear stitched channels give this quilt modern texture. One color in the front, another in back, and finely edged with a filled border. Made with linen, organic cotton, and light-weight cotton fill. * 52% linen and 48% organic-cotton covering * All-season 1800-gram cotton fill * Matches easily with a range of bedding options * Hand-guided machine stitching for exc...
Since polyester batting became available sixty years ago it has been the batting material most always used in Amish quilts. Being much easier to quilt than raw cotton batting found in antique quilts and by making a quilt much easier to launder (wet cotton batting weighs 'a ton!') practical Amish women quickly made the switch. Excellent but more expensive woolen batting is also occasionally used in Amish quilts.
Quilting is often thought of as communal activity such as a quilting bee where woman gather around a quilt frame to quilt a bed quilt. With Amish quilts today two, three or four people may work together to make a single quilt, but instead of quilting together each takes on a one or more of steps in the quilt making process. The first step in the process is to select the quilt's design and select and purchase the fabrics to be used in the quilt. Second step is to assemble the quilt top. Third step is to do the quilting and the fourth step is add the binding and ready the quilt for sale. It is not unusual for a different person to do each step. But the most common practice is for one person to do steps one, two and four and another person to the quilting. Occasionally a single person will do it all. The reason for the division of labor is that the work involved in each of the steps is quite different. The ability and artistic talent to select fabrics is not common --better for someone with this talent to apply it to the making of many quilts. Piecing a particular quilt top becomes easier and the workmanship better after quilter has made a half dozen tops of that design. So it is best to turn to a woman who is expert with a particular design to make the quilt top with that design. Quilting usually is not specialized to a particular design or style of quilt and is less cerebral -- in fact it may be a great distraction from the problems of the day. Applying the binding and readying the quilt for sale -- which means finding and removing spots, finding then adding missing lines of quilting, requires attention to detail. The coordination of the whole process is usually done by the person selecting the design and fabrics. This person selects Amish and Mennonite friends to work with on each quilt. Each person working on the quilt works on it in their own home. All work is done in America.

Here are our choices for the top 10 best backpacking quilts based on price, insulation, temperature rating, weight, features, versatility, sizing, and availability (see below for detailed explanations of each criteria.) All of these quilts are made and sold by so-called cottage manufacturers, which range in size from one-man shops to medium-sized businesses that employee dozens of people. All of them produce very high quality products that are significantly lighter weight and better performing than the quilts produced by mass-market gear companies like ENO, Therm-a-Rest, Kammock, Sea-to-Summit, and Sierra Designs.
Unless you live in the tropics, most of us need a little warmth at night! A well-made quilt is the perfect bed topper that can both keep you cozy and set the decor tone for your room, and it’s also an easy and inexpensive way to introduce an all-new color or pattern into your bedroom. Whether you live in a warmer climate where you just need light coverage or a colder one that requires some real layers, quilts come in a variety of styles, materials and weights to suit your needs. The beauty of a quilt is that it can work alone or with layers of other bedding, so it can easily transition through changes of season or simply from napping during the warm daytime and going to bed in the chilly night.
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