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EILEEN FISHER HOME BY GARNET HILL The shimmer of silk, the comfort of cotton. Subtle quilting adds slight texture, with increased tacking, placed just so, for refined drama. * Front is 70% organic cotton and 30% silk * Backed with 100% organic cotton voile * 200-gram recycled poly fill * Quilt and sham have quilting on front only * Quilt has denser tacking at bottom hem; Standard Sham has denser ta...
Down comforters are rated by fill power. The higher the number, the more air the down traps and the warmer it will be. So if you're looking for something extra-toasty, you'll want a fill power of 600 or higher. Make sure to also check the construction: A baffle-box design (that looks like the checkered patterns on quilts) has walls of fabric to help contain the down so it doesn't move from one section to another and cause lump or cold spots.
If you live in a place with a real change in seasons, look for a midweight quilt that will be comfortable when it’s warm out, but that’s easy to layer in the colder months. Choose a quilt in a solid, neutral color to give yourself the most flexibility as you transition through the seasons: In summer, pair it with lightweight cotton or linen sheets, then in winter trade in flannel sheets and top it with an extra throw blanket or duvet if you need more warmth.

Goose comforters are incomparable to any other type of bed covering. Until you have slept underneath a warm goose comforter, you have not experienced the most amazing rest of your life. Yes, they are that spectacular. While it is easy to believe these comforters are restricted for winter use, the construction of down comforters is meant for different levels of seasonal use.
Since polyester batting became available sixty years ago it has been the batting material most always used in Amish quilts. Being much easier to quilt than raw cotton batting found in antique quilts and by making a quilt much easier to launder (wet cotton batting weighs 'a ton!') practical Amish women quickly made the switch. Excellent but more expensive woolen batting is also occasionally used in Amish quilts.
Since polyester batting became available sixty years ago it has been the batting material most always used in Amish quilts. Being much easier to quilt than raw cotton batting found in antique quilts and by making a quilt much easier to launder (wet cotton batting weighs 'a ton!') practical Amish women quickly made the switch. Excellent but more expensive woolen batting is also occasionally used in Amish quilts.
This option from Pacific Coast is a lower priced style for the brand, but still maintains the key attributes of a quality down comforter. On the downside, it needs to be professionally laundered or dry cleaned. It has a 550 fill power in a 100% cotton fabric with a 230 thread count that has loops to attach to a duvet cover. It also features a diamond box design with a unique border that helps keep down evenly distributed throughout.
Filled with humanely sourced duck down, the 600-fill-power Casper Down Duvet is every bit as strategically engineered as its famed mattress. A departure from traditional baffle-box quilting, its sewn-through seams create slim, rectangular chambers that hold the down and retain its fluffiness. As a bonus, it even has corner loops to hold a duvet cover in place.
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